Children's Environmental Health Network
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The clean-up of Britain's cities has begun - but at what cost?

Children's Health in the News - November 22, 2014 - 9:00am
Virtually unnoticed, this week witnessed probably the most important move to clean up the air in Britain’s cities since the Clean Air Act vanquished the old “pea-souper” smogs almost 60 years ago.

EPA sued for failing to track lead.

Children's Health in the News - November 22, 2014 - 9:00am
Two environmental and public-health groups have sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for what they say is a failure to track reductions in lead pollution in Ohio and five other states.

Neighbors express concerns about proposed solar farm in Mansfield.

Children's Health in the News - November 22, 2014 - 9:00am
Neighbors are concerned about a proposed solar farm eyed for the former Compo Chemical site on Branch Street, saying the project could hurt property values and might pose health and environmental hazards.

Australia's sad legacy of pollution.

Children's Health in the News - November 22, 2014 - 9:00am
When the Pasminco lead smelter at Boolaroo, New South Wales closed in 2003 it left behind more than a century’s worth of toxic pollution. The surrounding community and environment continues to suffer from the plant’s legacy.

Coal seam gas a hard sell for the NSW government.

Children's Health in the News - November 22, 2014 - 9:00am
Coal seam gas may be his bete noire, but Ed Robinson still likes a good gas barbeque. Several times a week, the beef farmer fires up the grill on the back verandah of his Gloucester home, and cooks up a carnivore storm.

Local health advocate rebrands youth fitness program to better address city's health deserts.

Children's Health in the News - November 22, 2014 - 9:00am
In addition to widespread food deserts, Baltimore City is pockmarked with what local health advocate Munir Bahar calls health deserts, areas of the city with no access to places to engage in physical activities - places with no gyms, no bike lanes, and no recreation centers.

Environment Mass. calling on Baker to set strong solar goals.

Children's Health in the News - November 21, 2014 - 9:00am
As governor-elect Charlie Baker pieces together his administration, advocates for solar power are urging the Massachusetts Republican to make the renewable energy source a key initiative.

Half Yemen's children malnourished as hunger worsens strife.

Children's Health in the News - November 21, 2014 - 9:00am
Nearly half the children in Yemen are suffering from malnutrition, the agriculture minister has said, as insurgencies, water scarcity and climate change exacerbate sectarian strife in the Arabian Peninsula's poorest state.

Coal's black wind: Pregnant women in parts of India advised to stay away.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
In some regions of India, a married woman will return to her mother’s house for the last trimester of pregnancy and the birth of her child. But in Mettur, pregnant women are advised by their doctors to stay away. “Black wind” from a coal yard wafts constantly across poor neighborhoods, settling on rooftops, walking paths and even indoor furniture.

Childhood cancer treatments can result in host of chronic illnesses.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
The Children's Cancer Institute of Australia has found that one in 900 people between the ages of 16 and 45 is a cancer survivor, with up to 70 per cent of long-term survivors experiencing a host of chronic illnesses related to their original cancer treatment.

Australia's asthma rate one of the world's highest.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
Australians suffer more from asthma than almost any other people in the world, a new report has found. Even people living in countries known for pollution problems such as China are less affected by the potentially deadly condition, but why remains a mystery.

Heart infection rates rise after antibiotic use cut.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
Rates of a deadly heart infection have increased after guidelines advised against giving antibiotics to prevent it in patients at risk, research shows.

UN calls for end to open defecation.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
The UN called on Wednesday for an end to defecation in the open, with fears growing that it has helped spread the deadly Ebola virus ravaging west Africa.

South Sudan: Floods displace over 53,000 people in Payinjiar County.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
Heavy flooding in South Sudan's Unity state has displaced some 53,945 people in Payinjiar county. A secretary for the South Sudan Relief and Rehabilitation Commission (SSRRC) said on Tuesday that rising floodwaters sparked widespread panic among residents.

Sierra Club seeks millions more for gold mine cleanup.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
The state Sierra Club took legal action Wednesday to force stricter controls on the largest gold mine ever proposed for South Carolina, saying the industrial-scale operation could leave the public on the hook for a pollution cleanup long after the mine shuts down.

Ask Arizona tribes: We need clean power.

Children's Health in the News - November 20, 2014 - 9:00am
Reducing our carbon pollution needs to be a priority for everyone because climate change affects everyone. Although some communities are impacted more significantly than others by climate change, it is a national and global crisis.

How government and Boeing fought to curtail Duwamish River cleanup.

Children's Health in the News - November 19, 2014 - 9:00am
There's been a years-long lobbying campaign by Seattle, King County, the Port of Seattle, and Boeing to limit the amount of dredging done in the Duwamish River. The campaign stretched from South Park to the U.S. Capitol, according to records.

Fracking the poor.

Children's Health in the News - November 19, 2014 - 9:00am
An analysis found that the 5 million California residents who live within a mile of an oil or gas well have a poverty rate 32.5 percent higher than that of the general population. Overall, FracTracker found that almost 20 percent of Californians who live below the poverty line—more than 700,000 people—also live within a mile of a well.

How much arsenic is in your rice?

Children's Health in the News - November 19, 2014 - 9:00am
Recent testing and analysis provides new information on the risk of arsenic exposure in infants’ and children through rice cereal and other rice products.

10 million child deaths attributed to a lack of toilets.

Children's Health in the News - November 19, 2014 - 9:00am
In a world in which 14 percent of the population in the 21st century still defecate outdoors, children remain among the most vulnerable to a lack of toilets, contamination from human waste and dirty water.
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