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Fish still contaminated with phased-out Scotchgard chemical.

Children's Health in the News - September 26, 2014 - 9:00am
A persistent chemical formerly used in Scotchgard still contaminates most fish in U.S. rivers and the Great Lakes despite a phase-out a dozen years ago, a new federal study shows.

New rules for Detroit demolitions designed to protect public health.

Children's Health in the News - September 26, 2014 - 9:00am
Many of the homes being razed in Detroit are in neighborhoods where people still live. So Detroit officials sat down before the blitz to come up with some new regulations designed to keep people safe from dust, and from hazardous materials that could be in that dust – like lead, or asbestos.

Outbreak of a respiratory illness mystifies scientists,

Children's Health in the News - September 26, 2014 - 9:00am
An outbreak of respiratory illness first observed in the Midwest has spread to 38 states, sending children to hospitals and baffling scientists. As of Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had confirmed 226 cases of infection with enterovirus 68.

France to introduce plain cigarette packaging.

Children's Health in the News - September 26, 2014 - 9:00am
The French government has unveiled controversial new measures to cut the number of its smokers, including introducing plain cigarette packaging. The proposals are specifically aimed at reducing the high rates of teenage smokers in France.

Soda fight’s last stand.

Children's Health in the News - September 25, 2014 - 9:00am
Voters in San Francisco and Berkeley will consider a 1 or 2 cents per ounce sin tax on sugar-sweetened drinks on the ballot in November. If the tax passes in one of the two cities, as polls show it might, it’ll be the first loss for the beverage industry, which has emerged undefeated in more than 30 similar fights in recent years.

The anti-vaccination epidemic.

Children's Health in the News - September 25, 2014 - 9:00am
Because we're unwilling to learn from history, we are starting to relive it. And children are the victims of our ignorance. An ignorance that, ironically, is cloaked in education, wealth and privilege.

Berkeley, California, drafts cell phone health warnings.

Children's Health in the News - September 25, 2014 - 9:00am
On Oct. 28, the Berkeley City Council will consider legislation that could make it the first U.S. city to require retailers to warn consumers that radiation from cell phones may be hazardous to their health.

US Sen. Charles Schumer pushes bill banning top ten toxic flame retardants.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
U.S. Senator Charles Schumer was in Albany yesterday to push a new bill banning the 10 most toxic flame retardants.

Do greener neighborhoods produce healthier babies?

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
Pregnant women who live in leafy, green neighborhoods are less likely to have premature or low birth weight babies, a new study suggests.

Report: Higher cancer rates in areas near Cold Water Creek.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
Data released from the Department of Health and Senior Services confirms what people who have lived near Cold Water Creek have been saying for years. They feared the rare cancers they were getting at an early age were directly related to radioactive contamination in the creek.

On fracking, earthquakes and Indian Point.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
New York is right to not blindly follow other states that have green-lighted fracking without thoughtful consideration of these consequences. It's difficult to turn back the clock once public health and safety has been jeopardized.

Why we still need wilderness in the era of climate change.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
By coincidence, the People's Climate March comes just two weeks after the fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act. It's time to double-down on wildness as a touchstone for our relationship with the rest of life on Earth.

Cleaner, more efficient cookstoves should be on front burner of women’s needs in developing countries.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
For 3 billion of the world’s people, cooking can be downright dangerous, according to the World Health Organization: Four million premature deaths a year are blamed on exposure to toxic smoke from cooking fires.

Ban sought on children working on tobacco farms.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
Thirty-five House Democrats are urging the Obama administration to prohibit children from working on tobacco farms, citing concerns about ill health effects.

Big soda makers agree on effort to cut Americans’ drink calories.

Children's Health in the News - September 24, 2014 - 9:00am
The commitment, made Tuesday at the 10th annual Clinton Global Initiative, was an acknowledgment by the companies of the role their products play in the country’s obesity crisis and the escalating rates of diabetes and heart disease that accompany it.

USGS report: Pesticides contaminate nation's streams.

Children's Health in the News - September 23, 2014 - 9:00am
A new U.S. Geological Survey study shows that pesticides continue to infiltrate the nation's streams, however, the types of pesticides mixing with the water are changing.

Tackling climate change presents a 'golden opportunity' for public health.

Children's Health in the News - September 23, 2014 - 9:00am
Biking, walking and other active forms of transportation are just a few ways that reducing our use of fossil fuels may benefit not only the planet but also our health and the economy, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Monday.

Pregnant women in Durham, North Carolina, test high for cadmium, study finds.

Children's Health in the News - September 23, 2014 - 9:00am
While the researchers noted that a surprisingly large number of pregnant women in the study smoked cigarettes, which contain cadmium, even the non-smokers in the study had high levels of the element in their blood. But the reason for the exposure in non-smokers was unclear.

California confirms enterovirus D68 cases.

Children's Health in the News - September 23, 2014 - 9:00am
Four cases of a virus that can cause severe respiratory illness in infants and young children — especially those with asthma — have been found in California, state health officials announced Thursday. Officials confirmed three cases of enterovirus D68 in San Diego County and one in Ventura County.

For some African American residents, climate change is but one of many priorities.

Children's Health in the News - September 23, 2014 - 9:00am
For Marc Polite, climate change is certainly important – but on the day of the Climate Change March, it competed with a commitment to his cultural heritage. Other individuals from the African American community expressed similar sentiments.
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